A Guide to Common Bathroom Styles

April 9th, 2020

Having a bathroom that reflects you and your personality is what helps bring life into your morning everyday. Finding a bathroom that caters to you is like having the perfect pair of shoes to complete your outfit. Here are four common bathroom styles to kickstart the process of designing your bathroom.

Contemporary

Contemporary bathrooms highlight clean and open spaces, paired with crisp lines and angles. Contrast is a huge component in this style and mainly features black and white with a pop of high contrast, cool toned colors. Frameless shower enclosures, freestanding tubs and wet rooms are usually staple pieces with this theme. Paired with stone, wood and tile, home owners may choose to opt for matte black fixtures or metal accents such as stainless steel or copper for a visually striking appearance. While the rest of the bathroom remains relatively unadorned, this leaves room for creative tile layouts.

Industrial

Industrial bathrooms hone in on the ideas of minimalism and simplicity while supporting a utilitarian feel. While inspired by places like warehouses and old power plants, materials such as visible bricks, exposed pipes, and concrete are a must. Fixtures such as wall lights with Edison bulbs, metal framing and upcycled pieces help to add character to the space.

Traditional

Traditional bathrooms are timeless as well as elegant. They sparkle and gleam while showcasing brilliant white bathtubs, pendant lights, porcelain pedestal sinks, and chrome fixtures. Built-in furniture, such as vanities, offer lots of cabinetry for storage and arched bay windows give off European vibes. Choices of vintage, subway or penny tiles, along with wooden trim or even statement wallpaper or woven rug, can add to the detail and d├ęcor of the bathroom.

Modern

Modern bathrooms strongly emphasize clean straight lines and are often designed in a "wet-room" style. These bathrooms display floating vanities, frameless mirrors, freestanding tubs and draw attention to countertops and sinks. They mostly stick to a crisp black on white or monochrome color scheme and may highlight geometric shapes along with pops of color in frequently used tile patterns such as herringbone or chevron.



This is a simple guide to help you generate an idea of what you're looking to incorporate in the results of your remodel. Once you've gained a general understanding, you can either stick strictly to a specific style or you can pull elements from two or more aesthetics to fit your personal needs. Whether that's special attention to architectural details, a sleek and clutter-free space, or a more lived-in look, a key component in your bathroom design is for your space to be a direct representation of you!